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  • Vasili Papathanasopoulos

5 LESSONS KIRRAH AMOSA LEARNT WHILST CREATING 'POSSESSIVE'

Possessive is out now!

Image: Siapo Screen


Canberra-based R&B artist Kirrah Amosa has shared her new single, Possessive. To mark the occasion, the singer has shared with MILKY some lessons she learnt whilst making the song.


"2022 is officially the new year of birth as I have completely shed all remnants of the shame and doubt that fueled my being and have fully embraced my good and semi-toxic traits e.g., Possessive. Accepting this darker side of me was nothing short of absolute liberation, so if you’re anything like me, I offer you this." Amosa shares.


"Instead of entering the always-vicious screening cycle with a new potential partner, feel free to play them ‘Possessive’. Let ‘em know what to expect, and if they get surprised by your ‘passion’ (or emotion-filled mood swings), that’s on them.”



ONE

I learnt I don’t need to pretend everything is rainbows and pancakes. Possessive was the first time I let me aggressive side see the mic, the funniest part being; I’ve never had more positive feedback about a song I wrote. I tried being the cool, chill girlfriend for too long and got BORED. My poor (/v lucky) boyfriend.



TWO

Less really is more. I’m sick of trying to tell myself this because I really struggle writing simple melodies and haate predictable lyrics. Hate. As much as I hate when people tiptoe around and sugarcoat the point. Possessive feels like my greatest achievement because I think I simultaneously avoided both things I hate - yay.



THREE

Turns out I’m a hella good director. I lost serious sleep over picturing every single frame of this video. I’ve had so many dud music videos in the past that I assumed I was the problem but I think the true problem was the lack of me. I was so involved in this filming process that I finally came away with a product I could be proud of, hugely thanks to the team on the day too.



FOUR

I always thought that singing meant yelling. Not really but kinda. I would pride myself in clean notes, perfect diction, and conveying my message through increasing volume. But when writing Possessive, I would write a few lines then we’d roughly record them so I wouldn’t forget nek minnit they ended up being the final takes. Compared to my vocal delivery in the past, I practically spoke or whispered this entire song and I’ve never felt so heard or connected to my music. Not for everyone, defs for me.



FIVE

I learnt that finding your sound can take time. I’ve been singing since before I could speak, writing songs since primary school, and releasing music consistently for over five years but I can honestly say I’m only proud of my releases within the past 6 months. It’s taken this long to realise what I like to do, not just replicate what I heard or saw from other artists. I know my own voice like the back of my hand meaning I thought I had to use every inch of it in every song - I was so wrong lol. I tried the girl group, I tried the big dance numbers, I tried making myself smaller to fit boxes that held other successful artists and am only experiencing true success now that I’ve decided I need nothing other than exactly what I am. Took a lot of time and hard conversations, particularly between me and my unwavering manager, Al, who has seen my huge potential since day one. I’m still figuring it out but my music has never been more authentic and my audience more loyal than since I was able to share this unfiltered, true version of me. I’d recommend it.



Possessive is out now!


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